Lab - Introduction to Online Resources and the Internet.

 
   

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Lab - Introduction to Online Resources and the Internet.

We�ll start by going to the FMCC website - http://fmcc.edu. The main FMCC �entrance� site is the home page of an internet website - it has a brief, simple address and many webpages it links to (anything that �turns� the cursor into a hand is a link, which in this case will send you to other FMCC-related places). From wherever you are, find the link at the top of the screen for �Evans Library� and click on it.

On the Main Page of the Library�s subsite, click on the �Research Guides� link above the �Search Everything� box, then on the �Science� option on the long list that comes up. For these options, from off-campus, you�ll need your number from your ID card for access (from on-campus, you won�t). This is a list of some of the databases that the library subscribes to. Databases are collections of magazine and newspaper articles stored on distant computers. When you click on one of them, you�re not really going to an internet site � you�re accessing a service that the library buys, using internet lines to connect. This resource is equivalent (almost) to getting the actual magazines and newspapers themselves and reading the articles. Click on the link that says �General Science Collection.� What you get is that particular database�s search page - the supporting computer will search that database for all of the articles it has for whatever terms / words you tell it to look for. It can do this simply or, by selecting a different option from the search result page, look with particular focus and/or limitations.
Pick a biology-related topic �
something specific works better... _____________________________________________
put it in for a search.
What are your search�s results (how much did the computer find)? (If you don�t get any, try a different term and write it here with those results.)

___________________________________________________________

If the list you�re getting looks like a lot of very technical articles, go over to the right where there are some options to narrow the search � you might get more readable articles that way. Pick a particular example from the list the database gives you.

Give the name of the source the article is from. __________________________________
It should have the magazine, author, the publication date, the volume, issue, and page numbers, the sort of information you�ll need if you�re going to list it as a reference in a paper or class abstract.

Briefly, what�s the article seem to be about? ______________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________

Return to the page with the articles links and click the �Proquest Biology Journals� link. Run a search on the same subject you used above. This should access at least a few different sources.
What are your search�s results? _______________________________________________

You may want to use the �Magazines� option, on the left side. Look through - the details below each entry will tell you if an abstract (a brief summary) or the whole article text is available - until you find a whole article (there�s an option to the right that lets you confine the list only to whole text) that seems appropriate to what you were looking for. Click on that article.
What source is the article from? ______________________________________________

There may be parts of the original article not available through the database - if you use a database article in a paper, always cite the database at the end of the reference so that info missing because of the database�s omissions doesn�t get blamed on you.

Briefly, what�s the article seem to be about? _____________________________________

__________________________________________________________________________
Back on the library�s �Science� page, pick �View More Results�, which will take you to a long list of database. Pick one of the �general databases� and run a search on the same subject you used above. You�re much more likely to get an easier-to understand result there.

Which database did you decide to use? _________________________________________

What are your search�s results? ______________________________________________

Pick a periodical reference (often what you find is a pamphlet, or book entry, etc.) if there are any. Look through until you find a whole article that seems appropriate to what you were looking for. Click on that article.
What source is the article from? _______________________________________________

Briefly, what�s the article seem to be about? _______________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________



Part Two - Internet Searches & Sources.

Put �www.infopeople.org/content/search-tools� in your address window and work from there. Also �www.onlineuniversities.com/blog/2010/03/100-time-saving-search-
engines-for-serious-scholars� are specialized science / biology-oriented possibilities, but may link to sites that demand registration. Use an engine, not a directory (these give you mostly internal links).

Which Search Engine have you chosen? ___________________________________

Now choose a Biology-based Topic again. It can be the same as Part One�s or something else.

Which Topic have you chosen? _________________________________________

If your chosen topic is more than one word, put down how you are going to put it into the Search Engine so that only sites with all of the words will be found in the way you want them:

If needed: _________________________________________________________
Note that most sites have �Advanced search� capacities and allow you to link phrases and exclude certain words.

How search engines look for things depends not just on what you tell them (although learning how to search is very important!), but also on what their computer �assumes,� combined with the basic patterns that each search takes. If what this means is not entirely clear, a trip to http://www.searchengineshowdown.com/features/byfeature.
shtml may help to explain things.

Look over some - at least 20 - of the descriptions of possible pages your search called up. You don�t have to actually click on them.

What sorts of Non-biology pages have come up (a couple of brief examples), if any?


___________________________________________________________________

Pick what seems a promising Biology-related page and click on it to go there.

What is the page name?
_____________________________________________

What is the page address/location?
(Long white box) http://

Briefly describe the page you�re on: ______________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

What sorts of links (usually in blue, cursor turns into a hand when your point at them) are here?

____________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________

What main site is the page part of? Look for a home link, banner name, link at the bottom, or �peel� (you may need to ask for help) the address back to slashes or to the end of �.com� or �.org� or whatever. Give the site name, not the address � these are usually different. It probably will be in the name bar, but may be just on the screen.

_____________________________________________________________________

Would this source be a reliable reference for a college-level paper? Why or why not?

_____________________________________________________________________
Clue: who put the information there, and do they have the expertise to be trustworthy?




Repeat the procedure you just did.

Pick a different topic and find a different webpage this time. You can try a different search engine, (no directories!) too.


Which Search Engine have you chosen this time? __________________________

Now choose a different Biology-based Topic.

Which Topic have you chosen? _________________________________________

If your chosen topic is more than one word, put down how you are going to put it into the Search Engine so that it finds your terms as you want them:

(If needed) _________________________________________________________


How search engines look for things depends not just on what you tell them (although learning how to search is very important!), but also on what their computer �assumes,� combined with the basic patterns that each search takes. If what this means is not entirely clear, a trip to http://www.searchengineshowdown.com/features/byfeature.
shtml may help to explain things.

Look over some - at least 20 - of the descriptions of possible pages your search called up. You don�t have to actually click on them.

What sorts of Non-biology pages have come up (a couple of brief examples), if any?


_____________________________________________________________________



Pick what seems a promising Biology-related page and click on it.


What is the page name?
_____________________________________________

What is the page address/location?
(Long white box) http://

Briefly describe the page you�re on: ______________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________


What sorts of links (usually in blue, cursor turns into a hand when your point at them) are here?

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________


What main site is the page part of? Look for a home link, banner name, link at the bottom, or �peel� (you may need to ask for help) the address back to slashes or to the end of �.com� or �.org� or whatever. Give the site name, not the address. It probably will be in the name bar, but may be just on the screen.

_____________________________________________________________________

Would this source be a reliable reference for a college-level paper? Why or why not?

_____________________________________________________________________
Clue: who put the information there, and do they have the expertise to be trustworthy?




Repeat the procedure you just did.

Pick a different topic and find a different webpage this time. You can try a different search engine, (no directories!) too.


Which Search Engine have you chosen this time? __________________________

Now choose a different Biology-based Topic.

Which Topic have you chosen? _________________________________________

If your chosen topic is more than one word, put down how you are going to put it into the Search Engine so that it finds your terms as you want them:

(If needed) _________________________________________________________


How search engines look for things depends not just on what you tell them (although learning how to search is very important!), but also on what their computer �assumes,� combined with the basic patterns that each search takes. If what this means is not entirely clear, a trip to http://www.searchengineshowdown.com/features/byfeature.
shtml may help to explain things.

Look over some - at least 20 - of the descriptions of possible pages your search called up. You don�t have to actually click on them.

What sorts of Non-biology pages have come up (a couple of brief examples), if any?


_____________________________________________________________________


Pick what seems a promising Biology-related page and click on it. 
What is the page name?
_____________________________________________

What is the page address/location?
(Long white box) http://

Briefly describe the page you�re on: ______________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________


What sorts of links (usually in blue, cursor turns into a hand when your point at them) are here?

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________


What main site is the page part of? Look for a home link, banner name, link at the bottom, or �peel� (you may need to ask for help) the address back to slashes or to the end of �.com� or �.org� or whatever. Give the site name, not the address. It probably will be in the name bar, but may be just on the screen.

_____________________________________________________________________

Would this source be a reliable reference for a college-level paper? Why or why not?

_____________________________________________________________________
Clue: who put the information there, and do they have the expertise to be trustworthy?


Part Three - Plagiarism of Internet Resources.

Choose a Search Engine to work with and click on it.
Which Search Engine have you chosen? ____________________________________

For this part, you need to find a definition of �plagiarism� from a web page about plagiarism and the internet.

If you decide to do your search for more than one word (a good idea), put down what you are asking the engine to search for.
Search terms: ____________________________________________

Begin your search. You need to find a source that defines plagiarism and relates it specifically to internet sources. For the webpage you=re going to use as a source for the definition, give the...

Page Name ____________________________________________________

Page Address http:// ____________________________________________

Below, give the definition of plagiarism in your own words, using your internet source as a reference. To avoid plagiarism, do not copy your source. You need to rephrase , which involves substantial rewriting - changing only a word or two is still plagiarism.

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________________

Don�t forget that plagiarism on written assignments is a violation of the college�s Code of Conduct and can result in severe penalties.


 
     

 

First Written 1998;   Web Version 2001:  Last Update 2016;  M. McDarby

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